Losing our rights. 

Having just taken a trip back to San Francisco I was reminded of a blog I wrote years back and it still remains real eave to in many ways today.

Kids seem to have more rights in their high school then I do when I travel. OK, I don’t want to beat this air travel thing into the ground but when I saw this letter to the editor in our Sunday Honolulu Advertiser I got all riled up again.

A Kilauea, Kaua’i reader wrote to the editor about the changes to Chapter 19 concerning student rights to privacy. She stated that if they were to allow for searches in lockers, drug sniffing dogs etc. the students would have to surrender their dignity on demand.
My sentiments exactly as I’m standing in the middle of the airport having air blown up my dress. And believe me I’m no Marlyn Monroe. But surrender my dignity I had to0 or I would not have been able to fly home.
Drug sniffing dogs? I ask you , how many of us have been seated waiting to get on a plane when someone lets the dogs out and he is sniffing what ever you may have in or on you? My right to privacy? Out the door.
Then she goes on to say bad outcomes will present themselves if we… “indoctrinate our youth to accept personal space violation from figures of authority.” Have I been indoctrinated?
And last but not least, the statement that had me hitting the paper with the back of my hand and ranting to Max as he sat at my feet. “Unreasonable searches of students’ bodies and property undermines our country’s core civic values.”!!!
So when do kids in school who may have drugs in their lockers or guns or both deserve more privacy then I do when I am boarding a plane? They are not even subjected to body searches. Unlike me just because some old lady with a uniform doesn’t like the way I look and pulls me over. Is it because I am taking a flight and she’s at work? or she has to wear a mans uniform and I’m in a dress and she would like to see me look miserable rather then look like I’m going to enjoy a trip to Hawaii?
I thought after 9/11 our core civic values were done away with. I did not realize we had rights anymore. Well at least someone has rights, just not adults. I don’t fly free from harassment, someone listening to my phone calls or reading what I search on line.
All I can say is, better watch out kids, your days are numbered. Your an endangered species. Beware when you see some little squat woman speaking with an accent descend upon your locker. Don’t say a word or you may end up in detention and never go home again.

Visiting Bishop Museum 

Bishop Museum is an artifact in  itself. Built in 1898, you step back in time when you enter into the main hall. 

The stair case you see here is carved from Koa. Elsewhere it is known as acacia. The Koa was cut down at the property of Princess Pauahi’s estate on the big island of Hawaii. 

The Koa was then sent to Minnesota where it was milled and sent back to Oahu where it was put into the museum. 

            A close up of the finniel carving

Charles Bishop, Pauahi’s husband,chose Minnesota because he felt that the Sweeds who lived in Stillwater Minnesota were the best carpenters. 

It was at the bottom of this stair case that a student taking a private evening tour with her class told me about her experience. 

As the guard turned out the lights they stood there and watched as a lightly scented light assend to the second floor and checked out each exhibit case and then ascended up to the third floor and do the same. It then descended to the first floor and was gone. 

Yes there are many types of artifacts and visitors to the Bishop. You never walk away disappointed. 

My computer has gone the way of the setting sun 

My battery is dead on my lap top I said as I cried into my coffee cup. It’s only ten years old. 

My kids are always telling me to get a grip and keep up with the times. Ma, there is no such thing as a $1.00 movie, Ma, get over it, hardly anything is made in America, Ma, that’s just how fruit taste now. Quit living in the past. 

And so I have to accept that my lap top had a good run. Without money though I’m going to be writing my Blog from my iPhone for a long, long time. 

A good friend came to town for a few days and all of us old friends were able to get together at the Hau Tree Lanai for dinner. 


            That’s me on the bottom right. 


And like my computer that was fabulous while I had it this sunset was breathtaking and entertained me and my camera for quite awhile. Then it was gone. 

I still have my iPhone though so I can share short post and some very special moments. Here is the photo that thrilled me and once again made me realize how lucky I am to live in Hawaii. 


What are they all staring at? Not this photo the next one. 

This mother seal was the first ever to give birth on the island of Oahu. She had her little pup last year right here in front of the restaurant. Can you see it on her right?  She returned this year so that I could see it. Well maybe not but you can bet she made the reunion of old friends extra special. 

First Day Of Summer

Well here in Hawaii, the sun is shining, the birds are singing and where do the people go?  Not to the museum.

We can count on a drop in visitors at Bishop Museum when it’s a beautiful day.

Because…. They are all at the beach!

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And here in Hawaii once you get to the beach what do you do?

 

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Pray for surf

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Have a great summer everyone.

Father’s Day

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My grandson checking out the surf with his dad

My grandson started to surf last year. His father takes him every chance he gets. These photos were taken when he was just starting out. Yes it was Father’s Day last week but for this dad he has made it father’s day with his son every day of the week. What a lucky boy.

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Paddling into the sunset

My grandson wanted some photos of him surfing and what could I say. An afternoon at the beach while the sun was going down and a camera? I could not say no. unfortunately the camera I have now is not the best. In frustration I gave my good Cannon to my son. Yeah I regret it but my son is doing wonderful with it and I know I would never have done that well. It is in good hands.

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Going for it

It was hard for me to focus my cheaper camera and hard for me to tell where my grandson was. When he stood up I was scanning the ocean.  I only seemed to find him when he was catching a wave. Frustrating.

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A father introducing his kids to the ocean

As I sat against the wall with my feet planted in the sand. I scanned the beach and watched every one in different stages of enjoyment. I saw this father with his two children and could not resist taking the photo. What an experience for these two little guys and what a great dad to take the time to introduce them to the wonderful world of the ocean.

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Sun setting and the boards are leaving the water

I wasn’t the only one taking photographs. You can just see two people on the other side of the surfboards. They were taking turns with their friends standing there while they took each others photos.

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Paddle boarding

The colors were like an old-fashioned post card as the sun descended. Just fabulous.

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Just bobbing along

Kids and adults bobbed along as the sky turned like a color wheel. Even the water sliding back to the ocean sparkled like champagne. I may not have been able to drink it but it still made me feel as happy as though I had.

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Deciding to get out of the water

Father and son take one last look and decide it’s time to get out of the water. With that decision made I packed up my camera and we headed back home. All was well in our world. My grandson was happy with his father’s day.

Communication

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Yes this is pretty much how he responds to me when I want to talk to him

How do I find common ground with my  preteen grandson?  For that matter just finding common ground with any of my grand kids has left me wanting.

I don’t want to just be grandma, the old lady that always wants a hug and a kiss. Of course here in Hawaii that is a given. Regardless of age, you would not dare enter a room without giving your kupuna (elder) a hug and a kiss. That type of respect is ingrained from day one.

I want to communicate. I want to discuss, to ignite conversation and encourage my grandchildren to experience life beyond cell phones and games.

Two of my grandsons love photography.  One lives about 20 miles away and I rarely see him. The other, Nico, lives in the same house as I do. Our communication has been limited.  “What’s for dinner?”  “When are we leaving for school?”  “Why did you pick me up so early from school? I was still talking to my friends.”  And last, but certainly not least, “Good night grandma, I love you.”

So Nico gets a Camera for his 12th birthday. He no longer has to take photos with his phone, he now has a DSLR!

Here we go, the common ground! “How would you like to go on some adventures like when you were younger?” I ask him.  Quickly I add, “I mean we can go to different places to take photos.” So far, he has used his cell phone to take photos of buildings as he drives by, photos of feet, close-ups of his dog and things around the house. Fun photos I admit, but his area is limited.

To my great surprise he says, “Yes!”  I suggest a drive to Haleiwa, ( where else?), we can go in the evening and photograph the sunset.  The date is set and surprise again, he reminds me that morning about our plan.

As we get ready to leave he heads out with his camera bag. I start to tell him that I would rather he put his camera around his neck, and he pulls a face on me and starts to get grumpy.  So I let it go.

When we get in the car I tell him to let me know if there is something he wants to photograph along the way. Out comes his phone and before I know it he is deep into YouTube.

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Unfortunately his phone arrives with him. Notice his camera is now around his neck. “Sort of late,”  I tell him as people will notice that we put his camera bag in the trunk. “Oh well,” I think to myself, live and learn.

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I try to call him over to explain about the two Hawaiian flags. How  the Hawaiians were forced to take down their flag and put up the American flag. He is having none of it.

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When we arrive at the beach he wants to know how long are we going to have to wait for the sun to set. I feel like he is the kid in the back seat of the car asking “are we are there yet?” I tell him, “Look around you.  The mountains are behind us and the clouds are setting on them. You can photograph that.” Too late, his phone is back in his hands.

P1010054At last he exchanges his phone for his camera and is starting to take photos. I think to myself had he been dressed all in white he would have blended right in with the windmill farm behind him.

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The sun is setting quickly and I’m not sure if he is still taking photos but I don’t want to miss it. This view was worth the hassle, and I marvel at the fact that it is now past 7 pm and the weather is still nice enough to be out in the ocean swimming. I want to tell Nico to try to get some people in his photos but I push that out of my thoughts. He will do what he wants to do.

After the sun has gone down he shows me his photos of the sand, his name in the sand and photos of things around. I did see one really nice sunset photo but he was clicking through his images so quickly that I’m not sure.

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I snap one last photo of the sun going down

P1010024I say goodby to the shack and beach where “Bay Watch” was filmed.

Maybe one day he will let me show him how to put his photos onto the computer so that we can see them together. I won’t hold my breath though.

As we head back home I resign myself to the fact that I have once again failed to communicate with him. “Nico, we don’t have to do this anymore I know you did not enjoy it.” But he surprises me and says he really did enjoy it and wants to do another adventure again. Wow! Communication at last.

He pulls out his phone and down the road we go.

Postman’s Holiday

   

Though I’m not giving tours today I’ve  come to the museum to view a special exhibit that will open to the public tomorrow. The above bird is part of that exhibit.

This is the oʻo. The few yellow feathers on him are the feathers used to make the capes that the Alii wore. (High chiefs)

The Hawaiians who collected the feathers could not kill the birds by order of the King. The bird became extinct because of all the insects and animals brought to the islands by explorers and industrialist such as the sugar and pineapple growers. 

  

This is a cape worn by the alli, Kalaniopuu. He was a warrior to recon with. He was also the uncle of Kamehameha. It was this cape that he gave to Captain Cook on Cooks third and last fatal vhoyage to Hawaii.  The yellow feathers came from such a bird as the oʻo above. 

  
  Along with the cape he gave the Captain the above mahiole . (Helmet) this was also made of feathers. The cape and helmet went back to England along with Cook’ body. It made its way to a few different museums where it came to rest in a museum in New Zealand. It is now on a long term lone to  the Bishop.