Lucky You Live Hawaii

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The Sun goes down and the water remains bath tub warm. The view makes me want to cry. But I’m not here. My son took this photo. This is his youngest son who is still going at it as the last rays flash into the horizon. If you look closely you can even see red sails in the sunset.

I am sure there are those of you who would give anything to be sitting on this beach watching the sky change colors like a chameleon. Maybe take a moonlight swim or just hold hands with someone special and kick your feet with a slight splash as you stroll along the shoreline.

I know that is what I would love to do. “Hey wait a minute” you may say, “you live in Hawaii, what keeps you from doing it?”

Hmm. Good question. I’m becoming a recluse. With all this beauty around me I rarely leave the house. So I’m going to force my way out of the house and look into a few places that one of my readers, Helen Dano, suggested. Sink holes and a natures preserve.

I will just do it! Meanwhile I need to head down to that beach and capture a few shots of my own. I need to be rejuvenated. After all, to paraphrase a saying here in the islands,  “I’m lucky I live Hawaii!”

 

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9 comments on “Lucky You Live Hawaii

  1. I know how you feel, we’re within a 20 minute drive from beaches and rainforest hinterland but rarely do we visit these places for the hell of it, my tendency is to only go there with visiting friends and family. Life just got so busy of late and my time at home with my dogs and doing my own thing is very precious – perhaps too precious and I need to expand on my perception of ‘my own thing’.

    Hope you get out and enjoy the beauty of your environment soon, even if it is just to sit on the beach and photograph the setting sun 🙂

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    • You know the more I talk to people about this the more I realize that is probably it. My home life or more like my crafts and dogs take preference. But I should take a look out my door now and then. Thanks for stopping by it’s good to get this feedback.

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  2. Janice says:

    That is one wonderful photo! You know – I can easily spend so much time at home doing things I enjoy that I don’t get out enought either. So I find reasons to connect with people, and this makes me go out. If you’re someone who naturally gravitates towards ‘Me-time’ I think that’s what you have to do. You have so many interests, and a lot of them relate to your family and your surroundings on Hawai’i, so if that’s what you want to do, I hope you’ll find more reasons and motivation to go out and connect. Hope you’re enjoying your island in the sun. From my island in the rain……!

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  3. megtraveling says:

    I hope you get out to enjoy the beauty of the island soon. I’m sure you’ll take some nice pictures when you do… 🙂

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  4. Helen Dano says:

    Yes! Look these up before you go because there is biology, geology, a sad –political history, all in the name of the rabid development of the Ewa plains. And after you travel to those sinkholes, get in your car and keep traveling to get to the lovely, gentle green beaches on the Ewa shoreline, rarely visited by tourists –and even locals, except for the novice surfers. But while standing there, imagine: this is where Keala, considered the most beautiful woman in Hawai’i (I think this is around the 1500-1600s, your reclusive moments can research), stolen away from her Maui roots to become the long dedicated wife of an older chief, who intentionally set the lost hills of Lihue on the eastern side of the Wai’anaes (facing your reclusive home) as one of the island capitol sites of O’ahu (because of some great sadness in his life: to be far from the ocean that was like a lifeline to Keala, a highly accomplished surfer).

    Please don’t lock yourself in: you have the archives and libraries of the Bishop Museum (there’s a great place to be locked in) at your disposal, being that you still are a guide there? No, please don’t even entertain the idea of reclusivity while you live in Hawai’i and so many of us are wishing we are where you are,
    while you have a grandchild who you can guide in knowing the history and beauty of his birthplace.

    When I was a kid, I thought I knew that island O’ahu well. Nope. And so many of those political heads know so little of O’ahu too; or they wouldn’t have let it go the way it’s gone, they would have been so active to conserve much of it.

    There is still so much beauty and from where you are, you have near entry into the hills of Wai’anae and its spell-binding vistas all the way out to Diamond Head. Imagine, you say to your grandchild, what chiefs imagined could be theirs while looking out at this vast land. Imagine the taro plantations, the many sandalwood and koa trees in these hills, the war training center on the Ewa plains, the proud Waikele winding its way to the harbor (I think it’s route is about 30 miles long!)

    You need to show the right ways to those who will come after you. There will be lots of time to be shutted out of life; don’t rush towards it so.

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  5. Yes, lucky you. Get out of the house and enjoy. “bath tub warm water”. That is what I dream about, for a swim. Insted I have to dress like an icebear just to get out at the moment. Envious. 😉

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    • I have been in cold weather to shop and was so frustrated as you entered the stores only to be overwhelmed by hot air. Then you end up carrying your coats and sweaters with you and then outdoors again you have to bundle up. I guess that can get old. But there is beauty in both. Though you have to bundle up you do have some very unique experiences because of it.

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